La Maladie de lAddernuo Documentaire Choc

Is it filmingé Hi, my name is Olivier Thériault I'm 22 and I suffer from the Addernuo Disease quot;Addernuoquot; is the contraction of two Latin words quot;Sternuoquot; and quot;Addormioquot; that respectively mean quot;to sneazequot; and quot;to fall asleepquot; So, the disease is a hormonal malfuction. Everytime I sneeze, my body sends a signal that pass through my thyroid gland

but it's defective, so when the signal reaches my brain it's too strong and my brain can't manage it. By then, my brain automatically goes into sleep mode. To put it simply, everytime I sneeze, I fall asleep. 8% of the population are likely to develop the Addernuo Disease. That means approximately 1 out of 12 people. The first time it happened to me, I was 19. And that was a huge shock cause it happened to me while I was iving my car.

It was a huge impact, but as you can see, I escaped unhurt. At first, I didn't know what was going on with me so I kept living my life as if nothing had happened, but the same thing kept happening to me. Come on, come on, come on, hurry up. Pull! PULL! He looks like a dead frog.

Come here. Hey we got him! The most difficult part isn't when I fall and hurt myself but it's when I wake up and try to understand where I am. Now that the s found out I've had the Addernuo disease I can't have a job, I can't ive, I can't play sports, so most of the time, I spend my time watching TV or not doing much. I've hurt myself so many times that now,

my wants me to put a helmet everytime I get out of my apartment. I should be wearing it now, but don't tell my . It still keeps happening to me while I'mmy apartment but it's not that bad. There's no cure for that disease yet but the scientists are currently looking for one. So if you want to make a donation, go to the official facebook page. Or you can just show your support to the fight against the Addernuo Disease

by liking the page. My philosophy is to always keep the focus on the bright side and I think I found a good way to take advantage of that disease. So. I told pretty much everyting there was to tell. Do you have enough footageé Yeah yeah, we'll be able to make something out of it. Okay then. Thanks for taking your time to film this.

SECOND OPINION Hepatitis C BCBS Full Episode

NARRATOR:quot;SECOND OPINIONquot; IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY BLUE CROSSBLUE SHIELD, ACCEPTED IN ALL 50 STATES. BLUE CROSSBLUE SHIELD LIVE FEARLESS quot;SECONDOPINIONquot; IS PRODUCED IN CONJUNCTION WITH U.R. MEDICINE, PART OF UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTERMEDICAL CENTER, ROCHESTER, NEW YORK. PETER SALGO: THIS IS SECOND OPINION. I'M YOUR HOST, DR. PETER SALGO. THIS WEEK, MYTH OR MEDICINE HEPATITIS CCAN BE TRANSMITTED THROUGH A MOSQUITO BITEé HEPATITIS C IS PRESENT IN 1% OF THE U.S. POPULATION,SO THERE'S ABOUT 3.5 MILLION PEOPLE IN THIS

COUNTRY WHO HAVE IT. AND SPECIAL GUEST KIMBERLYBOSSLEY IS HERE. SHE HAS THE SAME DISEASE THAT SHE WATCHEDHER MOTHER DIE FROM. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: JUST THE DEPRESSION, SEEING NO CURE. KNOWING YOUR OWN MORTALITY WAS RIGHT IN FRONTOF YOU WAS DIFFICULT. PETER SALGO: THANKS SO MUCH FOR BEING HERE, KIMBERLY. I KNOW YOU'VE GOT A LOT TO TELLUS, AND I WANT TO GET RIGHT TO IT, BUT FIRST WHAT I'D LIKE TO DO IS INTRODUCE YOU TO YOURquot;SECOND OPINIONquot; PANEL. FIRST OF ALL BY THE WAY, THEY'RE GOINGTO BE HEARING YOUR STORY FOR THE FIRST TIME.

WE HAVE PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR LOU PAPA FROMTHE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER. AND DR. RAYMOND CHUNG FROM MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITALAND HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL. AND, KIMBERLY, TO UNDERSTAND YOUR STORY, WE'VEGOT TO GO BACK QUITE A WAY IN TIME. TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOUR PAST MEDICALHISTORY, AND SHARE IT WITH EVERYBODY. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: UM, MY MOM ACTUALLY WAS A 1965 KIDNEY TRANSPLANT. PETER SALGO: CAN WE JUST STOP JUST FOR A MOMENT TO POINTOUT, THAT'S EARLY. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: MMHMM. PETER SALGO: WE DIDN'T DO A LOT OF TRANSPLANTS OF ANYTHINGIN 1965.

SO YOUR MOM WAS A PIONEER. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: YES. PETER SALGO: OKAY. GO AHEAD. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: AND ALWAYS WANTED KIDS, BUT WAS TOLD THATSHE COULDN'T BECAUSE THEY DIDN'T KNOW HOW IT WOULD END UP WITH BEING A KIDNEYTRANSPLANTPATIENT. PETER SALGO: BECAUSE THE ANTIREJECTION MEDICATION MIGHTAFFECT THE CHILDREN AND ALL. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: EXACTLY PETER SALGO: SO I'M GUESSING SHE WENT AHEAD AND HAD KIDS.

KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: YEAH. PETER SALGO: YOU'RE HERE. KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: SO SHE TALKED TO THE DOCTORS, AND THEY SAID,quot;GO AHEAD,quot; AND WAS BORN IN 1968, FIRST BABY IN THE U.S. UNDER A KIDNEYTRANSPLANT PATIENT. AND ABOUT FIFTH IN THE WORLD. PETER SALGO: SO WHAT HAPPENED WHEN YOU WERE BORN, AROUNDTHAT TIME, FOR YOUR MOM AND FOR YOUé KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: SHE HAD LOST A LOT OF BLOOD DURING THE BIRTHAND HAD TO RECEIVE A TRANSFUSION. AND I BEGAN A SLEEPING SICKNESS, AND THEYWEREN'T QUITE SURE WHAT WAS GOING ON.

IT WAS THEN FOUND OUT THAT THEY ATTRIBUTEDTHE SLEEPING SICKNESS TO BEING ADDICTED TO THE ANTIREJECTION MEDICATION PREDNISONEAND IMURAN. PETER SALGO:SO WHAT DID THEY DOé I UNDERSTAND THAT THEY TRANSFUSED YOUR MOMBECAUSE SHE BLED. AND DID THEY TRANSFUSE YOU AS WELLé KIMBERLY BOSSLEY: I THINK IT WAS TRANSFUSIONINFUSION. PETER SALGO: THEY EXCHANGED. SO YOU HAD A TOTAL EXCHANGE TRANSFUSION.

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