SECOND OPINION Psoriasis APT Full Episode

(ANNOUNCER)Major funding for Second Opinion is provided by The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. An association of independent, locally operatedand community based Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies supporting solutions that make safe,quality, affordable healthcare available to all Americans. Second Opinion is producedassociationwith the University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. (MUSIC)

( Peter Salgo)Welcome to Second Opinion where you get to see first hand how some of the countries leadinghealthcare professionals tackle health issues important to you. Well each week our studio guests are put onthe spot with medical cases based on real life experiences and by the end of the programyou're going to learn the outcome of this week's case. And by the way, you'll be better able totake charge of your own healthcare too. I'm your host, Peter Salgo, and todayour panel includes our Second Opinion primary

care physician Lou Papa from the Universityof Rochester Medical Center, al psychologist Vickie Dowling, Christopher Ritchlinfrom the University of Rochester Medical Center and Alexa Kimball from Harvard MedicalSchool. All right folks, let's get right to work. I want to tell you about our case today, itbeginsthe pediatrician's office Lou with Sarah, she's 15 years old, a cheerleaderand the chart says she's also a soccer player and an honor student. At the age of 8 Sarah was diagnosed with guttatepsoriasis.

Okay, what's psoriasisé ( Lou Papa)Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin condition where the skin excessively grows, it can crack,it can bleed, it scales. It comesvarious different forms. ( Peter Salgo)And guttate is one of themé ( Lou Papa)One of those forms, yep. ( Peter Salgo)Why does psoriasis look the way it doesé ( Alexa Kimball)A number of different reasons, the first is

that the skin cells are turning over very,very quickly, overgrowing and so you get a lot of scale on the surface because, and thickness,because the skin can't shed ittime. ( Peter Salgo)A piling up from belowé ( Alexa Kimball)The other interesting thing is that you do get more blood vessels that grow to supportall of that growth and that gives it the very red, ugly look that people really don'tlike. ( Peter Salgo)Well, Sarah was diagnosed with psoriasis at the age of 8.

Isn't that unusual Vickieé ( Vickie Dowling)Many chilen have been diagnosed as youngsters. I myself actually was diagnosed as a youngsterbut it went into remission and didn't come back again until much later. ( Peter Salgo)So you have psoriasisé ( Vickie Dowling)I do have psoriasis. ( Peter Salgo)And how old were you when it first startedé ( Vickie Dowling)I was first diagnosed when I was 10.

What Is Psoriasis Symptoms Treatments Causes Pictures Types

What is Psoriasisé Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder thatis marked by patches of intensely itchy and flaky skin that doesn't go away with regularmoisturizers the way most ordinary y skin will. It can affect any part of the body, even thescalp and nails, and can be mild, moderate or severe. Basic Symptoms Skin itchiness and general discomfort arethe two things people most commonly associate

with the disease, and it often starts outas no more than brief rashes over certain parts of the body that look like little morethan y skin. As the condition worsens, though, those ypatches tend to get increasingly red and to grow; ultimately, the surface of the skinwill y out and form rough scales that often have a blistered look. Main Types There are usually five recognized types ofthe disorder, each with its own intensity and symptom specifiions.

Plaque psoriasis causes red, silverywhite,scaly skin lesions, and this is the most common variety. The condition can also comepustular form,which causes blisters to erupt on the skin that can leak pus or other fluids. This variation is most common on the handsand feet. Triggers and Causes The condition is caused by genes, and is usuallyrecognized by thosethe medical profession as an inherited genetic disorder.

Not everyone who carries the genes for thedisorder will necessarily suffer from it, Climate and weather, cold and y temperaturesin particular, can trigger the diseasemany people. Physical trauma can also be to blame. Psoriatic lesions often develop at the siteof a skin injury, usually right where things are healing and the skin is trying to regenerateitself. Most practitioners also think that stressand emotional health play a rolesymptom suppression and flareups.

People who are under a great deal of stressoften see the condition appear for the first time, or worsen if it is already present. Treatment Options There isn't usually any way to completelycure the condition, insofar as it is not medically possible to recode peoples' genetic predispositions. Certain mediions and treatment regimenscan help keep flareups suppressed, though, and can amatically alter patients' qualityof and enjoyment of life. Skincare experts usually start by lookingfor ways to reduce triggers.

Medied creams and ointments are commonlyprescribed, andsome cases UV light therapy, also known as “phototherapy,� can be useful,particularly for people who liverelatively dark and cold climates or who spend most oftheir days indoors away from natural sunlight.

Category:

Psoriasis Cure

Leave a Reply